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simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus
servants. >> rose: today the united states face as wave of foreign policy challenges, including the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >>
article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor jekyll, which is the nicer of the two is the economic issue. the dr. height is the strategic asia, is the security agent. if you look at the economic asia there's heavy amounts of interdependence, everybody is investigating each other. $19 billion in regional trade which includes india. if you look at the security asia, national entity, orders dispute, historical grievances just are driving things apart and you're seeing real impact on these. in the has its own problems in the region across china region across china. region across chandigarh on the border dispute. if you look at this is something that you want to be deeply engaged in or do you look at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by t
. what can our current president of the united states learn from churchhill's foreign policy? >> one thing churchhill would not believe in leading from behind. he believed in telling the facts and then rallying the people around the facts. >> steve: yeah. >> and what he can learn in this book, not only his many prophecies was proved to be true. but that the way he arrived at these predictions. that process is a premer for presidential leadership. >> steve: you think that it a big mistake for president obama in his first term to return that famous bust of churchhill to the british and took it out of the white house. >> well he did it, yes. when it went there the night before. yes, he was awful rejecting the wisdom of churchhill he could listen to churchhill he would say the important thing is not to be popular, but to be respected. and churchhill did that. he told the people the truth. that's the reason he was a great prophet not only did he know history but he had the courage to deliver the unvarnished facts unlike spineless politician or burrcrats. >> steve: maybe the president coul
. like, you can't do it all. we had an atlantic cover story weaselly that wasn't about foreign policy. the title was why women still can't have it all. but it does -- can america still have it all? and in the way, has framed that, the answer is no, that there are limits. >> steve, even as we rebalanced to the asia-pacific we have continued are deep engagement with the region, other countries just as if, there's one example in our defense strategic guidance put out in january talked about having to become a net provider of security. i think you see that over the last couple of decades, and you see ongoing today. we will continue to be engaged in a obvious of the middle east and north africa and globally. the united states is a global power. it is not a zero-sum game, particularly when you look at the importance of alliances and partnerships, both within the asia-pacific and globally. our objective is to continue to strengthen those alliances and partnerships, and if we, if i can pivot to the topic of china, to build on the areas of cooperation that we have across the border, including
as chairman of the judiciary committee subcommittee on immigration policy and enforcement. he understands the nuances of our legal immigration system and the vital importance of secure borders, especially as it relates to his role as vice chairman of the foreign awares -- affairs committee he brought a unique perspective to the foreign affairs committee, having served eight years on the permanent select committee on intelligence, and counterintelligence subcommittee. in the aftermath of september 11, congressman fwalingly tchared subcommittee on internal -- international, excuse me, terrorism nonproliferation and human rights and held one of the first hearings on the 9/11 commission's recommendations, a hearing that led to more than 10 provisions that were included in the final bill. congressman gallegly's long, distinguished career has been supported by the love and support of his wife janis and their four children and 10 grarne. congressman gallegly's dedication to our national security, strong borders, legal immigration, has contribute immensely to the betterment of our nation and we c
our foreign policy. the chair and i both have worked for several years now trying to get the law of the sea treaty into place. it's been bouncing around for decades. but it should be more than what they call consultation. every time we talk to the executive branch -- and i am a former member of the executive branch; i spent four years in the pentagon in the reagan administration -- they say that they have consulted and the definition of a consultation should be the secretary of state calling the chairman of the foreign relations committee or the secretary of defense calling the chairman of the armed services committee or coming over for a meeting. that is not the level of discussion and involvement that the united states congress should have when we are talking about long-term commitments with countries such as afghanistan and iraq. so this amendment is not draconian. it is very sensible. it basically says that in the situation where we have entered into this proposed relationship with afghanistan, that the key committees over here in the united states congress should have 30 day
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)